Black Throated Finch Recovery Team

WELCOME

 
The objectives of this site are to provide: 
 
 

THE ANNUAL WATERHOLE COUNT WILL BE CONDUCTED ON THE 22nd and 23rd OCTOBER 2016

 
This year’s black-throated finch (BTF) waterhole count will be held on Saturday the 22nd and Sunday 23rd October 2016 at various locations in the Townsville region. Once again the Black-throated Finch Recovery Team (BTFRT) is looking for volunteers for these two days to watch waterholes and count finches coming into drink. The count covers a three hour period of each morning.  
 
The BTF waterhole count is a great opportunity for new volunteer observers to support the BTF recovery programme and hopefully to see the endangered BTF at close quarters. If you are interested in joining one of the teams for the waterhole count then please log in and register your interest for the next water hole count. 
 

Visit us on facebook

 
Link to our facebook page    
 

FACT SHEET AND MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES

 
All you need to know about the Black-throated Finch is contained in this fact sheet. If you are a landholder wanting to protect and encourage Black-throated Finch habitat on your property the Management Guidelines will show you how.  
 

EXPLORE OUR SITE

 
Get a website login and browse the library. It contains a growing collection of papers, articles, photographs and maps. You are invited to contribute your own photographs and publications to the library. 
 
Have you been fortunate to see a Black-throated Finch in the wild? Report your sightings of the Black-throated Finch using the website. You will be helping to update the scientific knowledge of the bird and its distribution. 
 
Perhaps you would like to participate in activites to learn more about the Finch?  By having a website login you can volunteer for upcoming events. 
 
 

A HANDSOME BIRD

 
The Black-throated Finch is a small (up to 12cm), sleek and stocky bird. It has a thick, black bill and a black eye line which makes them appear to be wearing wrap-around sunglasses. They have a pale blue-grey head, cinnamon-brown body, black tail and black bib which extends down to the breast, earning them the nickname Parson Finch. 
 

TWO KINDS OF BLACK-THROATED FINCHES

 
There are two sub-species of the Black-throated Finch. The northern form (Poephila cincta atropygialis) has a black rump and the southern form (Poephila cincta cincta) has a white rump. This differentiating feature is not always easily observed as Black-throated Finches are small, tend to fly high and move rapidly. 
 
The northern subspecies can be found on Cape York Peninsula and west to the Gulf of Carpentaria. The southern sub-species was once found between the Atherton Tablelands (north Queensland) and north-east New South Wales and west to Alpha (central Queensland). However, since the late 1970s, the bird has rarely been recorded south of Clermont (Queensland - 23°S). This equates to a 50 to 80% contraction of its former range. The southern sub-species is now listed as ENDANGERED under Federal, New South Wales and Queensland legislation.  
 
A detailed Recovery Plan for the southern sub-species was approved by the federal minister for the environment in 2008. The Black-throated Finch Recovery Team was formed in 2002 to address the conservation needs of the bird across its range. Based in Townsville the Recovery Team supports the implementation of the Recovery Plan. 
 
More about what habitats they like